Active support of an idea or cause etc.; especially the act of pleading or arguing for something!

During the 2008 presidential campaign, a then-Sen. Barack Obama spoke about teaching “comprehensive sex education” to kindergartners: “It’s the right thing to do … to provide age-appropriate sex education, science-based sex education in schools,” he said. And by “science-based,” of course, he meant “Kinsey-based.”

So, what is age appropriate, science-based sex education?

United Nations Economic, Social and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) suggests children of all countries and cultures are entitled to sexual and reproductive education beginning at age five.

The report, called International Guidelines on Sexual Education, was released in June in conjunction with the U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA), an organization which works for universal access to “reproductive health care.”

In its rationale for creating the guidelines, the UNESCO report said it is “essential to recognize the need and entitlement of all young people to sexuality education.” An appendix backed that claim by pointing to a 2008 report from the International Planned Parenthood Federation that argued governments “are obligated to guarantee sexual rights,” and that “sexuality education is an integral component to human rights.”

The guidelines are designed, according to the report, to be “age-appropriate” and break down the suggested curriculum into four age groups: 5- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 12-year-olds, 12- to 15-year-olds and 15- to 18-year-olds.

SIECUS and Sex Ed

The authors of the report consulted the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) in building their curriculum framework. One of the two authors, Nanette Ecker, is a former SIECUS employee.

Like the UNFPA, SIECUS advocates for ensuring that “every person has the right and access to sexual and reproductive health, so that humanity and the natural environment can exist in balance and fewer people live in poverty,” according to the organization Web site. Their stated concern is the “depletion of natural resources” – which is reduced through access to abortions. (This SCREAMS Agenda 21!!!)

The founding director of SIECUS, Mary S. Calderone, was a director of Planned Parenthood. SIECUS currently belongs to the National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education, alongside groups like NARAL (The National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League) and The Human Rights Campaign.

The U.N. justifies their guidelines by stating in their report that “supporting traditional values on marriage and sex are faulty”.

“Abstinence is only one of a range of choices available to young people,” the authors wrote, describing abstinence-only programs as “fear-based” and “designed to control young people’s sexual behavior by instilling fear, shame, and guilt.”

It is not justifiable to entitle children to sex education starting from a young age and labeling abortion as a human “right.”

Is UNESCO has a bias against traditional marriage and sexual values? Read the caveat on page 60 of the report: “It should be noted that abstinence is often taught as one option for safer sex as part of a comprehensive sexuality education programmes.”

UNFPA is widely known as “one of the original population-control groups, so most of the things they do stem from that lens.” UNESCO has 193 member nations around the world, including the United States.

I’d expect such “educational” grooming tactics and opinions from Alfred Kinsey but not from public educators – not from the U.S. government.

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